My Freelance Work

  • Lucie Arnaz reveals tidbits from 5 of her mom’s classic ‘I Love Lucy’ episodes

    Today.com7/10/19

    “Oh Luuuuucy!”

    Beginning in the 1950s, that cry from “I Love Lucy’s” Ricky Ricardo signaled something hilarious was happening on TV. Fans of the early classic black-and-white sitcom followed the antics of stars Lucille Ball (as Lucy Ricardo) and Desi Arnaz (as Ricky) as they got into one scrape after the other, setting the standard for television sitcoms for decades to come.

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  • Neil Gaiman promised a dying friend he’d carry ‘Good Omens’ forward

    L.A. Times Envelope6/28/19

    Neil Gaiman has thrived for decades on entertainment’s fringe, crafting novels (“American Gods”), comics (“The Sandman”) and YA books (“Coraline”) about gods, monsters and parents with button eyes. But as he stood in Times Square recently, promoting Amazon Prime’s adaptation of “Good Omens” (co-written with the late Terry Pratchett), it seemed a tectonic shift had occurred. There he was, surrounded by satanic nuns singing Queen songs (watch “Omens” for context) and massive billboards promoting the show, wondering just how all this happened.

    The Envelope chatted with the tousled, black-clad, 58-year-old in charge of one of TV’s more creatively quirky endeavors to help puzzle it all out.

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  • Ruth Wilson relives her grandmother’s shocking discovery for Masterpiece

    6/19/19

    American audiences know Ruth Wilson through her ongoing role on TV shows like “Luther” and “The Affair,” but her latest project, Masterpiece’s “Mrs. Wilson,” sheds a new light on the 37-year-old actress. In it, she plays her own paternal grandmother, who in the 1940s discovered after her husband’s death that he had not only been a British spy but also a bigamist.

    The day after receiving her second Tony nomination, Wilson spoke with The Envelope about family ties — and how playing Alison Wilson taught her about who she was.

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  • Showtime’s ‘Desus & Mero’: Bronx attitude on the topics of the day

    L.A. Times Envelope - 6/11/19

    “Desus & Mero” is not your typical late-night talk show. Sure, there are jokes. There are personable hosts. There are interviews. But Showtime’s new series starring Daniel Baker/Desus Nice and Joel Martinez/The Kid Mero is faster, fresher, more anarchic — and about 100% less white. Longtime friends, Desus and Mero bring Bronx attitude and humor to the topics of the day while hosting guests such as Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Spike Lee. The Envelope sat down with the guys after a recent taping of their show in New York City to discuss going freestyle, self-policing — and who their No. 1 most wanted guest is.

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  • Bill Hader, America Ferrera: Is your favorite actor now your favorite writer or director?

    L.A. Times Envelope - 6/05/19

    Bill Hader, the star, writer, producer and a frequent director of HBO’s “Barry,” is a busy man. So busy, that sometimes he forgets — at least temporarily — which job he’s doing.

    “Half of my brain is thinking about the writing, and the other half is thinking about the themes [during shooting],” he says. “I’ve had [costars] Stephen Root and Henry Winkler going, ‘Hey, man, you’re mouthing my words.’ You really have to split your brain to do this job.”

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  • Anthologies like ‘Twilight Zone’ and ‘Black Mirror’ may soothe viewers’ cancellation angst

    L.A. Times Envelope - 6/05/19

    Alexandra Cunningham, showrunner on Bravo’s “Dirty John,” is a little upset these days. As she’s recently learned, her favorite show, “Counterpart,” has been canceled over at Starz after just two seasons. “It’s just been torn away from me,” she says. “I’m so invested. I lived in fear that this was going to happen.”

    Cunningham is not alone. For all the discussion about the Golden Age of television, networks have not exactly stopped canceling shows, often abruptly and without warning. That’s hardly new. But a change in modern television viewing may offer a solution to that heartbreak when it happens.

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  • TV Production Designers Overcome Limited Budgets With Imagination

    Variety - 5/30/19

    Sets crafted for television have not traditionally been known for their glamour, says “Fosse/Verdon” (FX) production designer Alex DiGerlando.
    “TV was always about characters interacting, and sets were something to fill the background,” he notes. “You got close-up and medium shots and you needed some kind of background to make it feel not random. To ground the action.”

    But as the action has ramped up, so have expectations for production design, even though networks don’t always make extra room in their below-the-line budgets, leaving the art department with the same funds whether a show is contemporary or period.

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  • Hair and Makeup Teams Put Their Best Faces Forward on Shows Like ‘This Is Us,’ ‘Pose’

    Variety - 5/30/19

    TV has no shortage of series that rely on massive explosions, fire-breathing dragons and mystical creatures. But many of the most impressive special effects on TV today are happening in the hair and makeup departments of shows such as “Pose,” “This Is Us” and “The Man in the High Castle.”

    “When you create a fantasy character, you’re telling the audience what they look like,” says “This Is Us” makeup department head Zoe Hay. “But when you create age makeup, everyone knows someone old. We have to be able to withstand incredible scrutiny.”

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  • Small-Screen Outfits Burst at Seams With Big Ambition

    Variety - 5/30/19

    It isn’t often that costumes get a direct shout-out in a TV show title. But then there’s Fox’s “The Masked Singer,” a singing competition series in which contestants all wore mascot-sized creature costumes, including full headpieces, to disguise themselves in front of a panel of judges.
    “Singer” became broadcast’s biggest mid-season hit.

    So all due credit to costume designer Marina Toybina, who translated the Korean concept series for American audiences — turning her costumes into the real stars of the show, at least until their occupants were revealed. “It’s go big or go home,” Toybina says. “Everyone’s trying to experiment with different ways of building costumes, going back to big pictures, big fabrics.”

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  • ‘Good Omens,’ ‘Killing Eve’ and ‘Russian Doll’: Odd pairings creating compelling TV

    L.A. Times Envelope - 5/30/19

    As author Neil Gaiman recalls, when he and the late Terry Pratchett joined forces to write their 1990 novel “Good Omens,” they made one critical decision that changed everything: They split up.

    Rather, they split a character up. “The best and smartest thing he did was to make one character into two,” says Gaiman of Pratchett, who died in 2015. “We ended up with a worldly demon and an angel. The joy of that was it gave us conversations in which they could each take different sides, and persuade one another. Once you have that — you have drama,” adds Gaiman, now showrunner on the Amazon Prime adaptation of “Omens,” which drops Friday.

    Across television, no matter what the platform, the basic theory when constructing a show seems to be that two heads are better than one — and two leads are often an instant shortcut to telling a great story. Even better is when those two characters are natural opposites but have commonalities that join them as friends, partners, or even just grudging allies.

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